Advertisement
   
Psychiatric News
PsychoPharm APA logo
Send Feedback   l   View Online
Current News      |      PN Archives      |      News Alert      |      News Update MARCH 3, 2017
IN THIS ISSUE

What’s in a Label?

Doctor writing prescription FDA label changes may influence prescribing decisions, but these changes often lag the latest science.

Study Suggests Cariprazine May Have Direct Effects on Negative Symptoms

Stephen Marder After 14 weeks, patients with elevated negative symptoms began to show greater improvements on cariprazine than those taking risperidone.
   

Why Aren’t There More Medications for Substance Use Disorders?

Pill bottles Despite the limited number of new candidates for treating substance use disorder, several companies are continuing to search for ways to reduce cravings and symptoms of withdrawal.
   

INDUSTRY BRIEFS

FDA Grants Teva Priority Review for Tardive Dyskinesia Therapy


Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. on Tuesday announced that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted a New Drug Application (NDA) for SD-809 (deutetrabenazine) for the treatment of tardive dyskinesia (TD). The agency also granted a Priority Review designation for SD-809, which allows for a faster evaluation of applications for drugs that could lead to significant improvements of serious health conditions.

SD-809 is small-molecule inhibitor of the vesicular monoamine 2 transporter known as VMAT2.

The NDA for SD-809 is based on the results of two phase 3 studies, including the AIM-TD (Addressing Involuntary Movements in Tardive Dyskinesia) that involved 288 patients with moderate to severe TD. results from the study showed that after 12 weeks of treatment, people who received daily doses of 12 mg, 24 mg, or 36 mg of SD-809 were at least twice as likely to show improvements in TD symptoms than those who received placebo.

According to a press release by Teva, the FDA is expected to make a final decision on SD-809 for the treatment of TD by August 30.
 

Advertisement
 
 

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

Which benzodiazepine would be an appropriate choice for the inpatient treatment of mild to moderate acute alcohol withdrawal in an elderly man with known liver cirrhosis?

A. Midazolam

B. Diazepam

C. Triazolam

D. Oxazepam

E. Alprazolam

Click HERE to answer


Advertisement
 
PSYCHOPHARM NEWS FROM AJP

Antidepressant Efficacy for Depression in Children and Adolescents: Industry- and NIMH-Funded Studies
READ MORE


Prescribing of Clozapine and Antipsychotic Polypharmacy for Schizophrenia in a Large Medicaid Program
READ MORE



Have a topic that you would like to see addressed in an article in PsychoPharm? Send your suggestions to Vabren Watts at vwatts@psych.org.

PsychoPharm Editorial Advisory Board
Philip Muskin, M.D., Columbia University Medical Center (Editor)
Anna Dickerman, M.D., Weill Cornell Medical College
Petros Levounis, M.D., M.A., Rutgers New Jersey Medical School
Jonathan Meyer, M.D., University of California, San Diego
Beth Salcedo, M.D., The Ross Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders, Washington, D.C.
Erin Zerbo, M.D., Rutgers New Jersey Medical School



Copyright © 2017 American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.

Important information: You are receiving this correspondence because you have previously requested to receive information via email. To unsubscribe to this electronic newsletter, please click here. Please do not reply to this email, as we are unable to respond to messages sent to this address. You can send your comments or questions to vwatts@psych.org. The content of Psychiatric News does not necessarily reflect the views of APA or the editors. Unless so stated, neither Psychiatric News nor APA guarantees, warrants, or endorses information or advertising on this site. Clinical information is not peer reviewed and thus should be independently verified. Privacy Policy.
Advertisement